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Hopeless Wanderer
“I keep wondering, how many people do you need to be, before you can become yourself.”
itscarororo:

deadstag:

melanistic, albino and natural fallow deers photographed by Mszafran on deviantart Source here

cool palette swaps

itscarororo:

deadstag:

melanistic, albino and natural fallow deers photographed by Mszafran on deviantart Source here

cool palette swaps

(via nowaitwhat)

hipstamaticsex:

"just yesterday" submitted by Khatuna

hipstamaticsex:

"just yesterday" submitted by Khatuna

(via artisticsexphotography)

"We are all broken, that’s how the light gets in." quoted via Ernest Hemingway  (via vvolare)

(Source: henretta84, via vvolare)

artisticsexphotography:
 

(Source: fohk, via d3ssins)

thomaszhuang:

Thomas Zhuang: Street Series, NYC #182, 2013

thomaszhuang:

Thomas Zhuang: Street Series, NYC #182, 2013

(via d3ssins)

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!
In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.
But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.
No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!

In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.

But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.

No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

(via nowaitwhat)